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Texas Instruments TI-5015

Date of introduction:  January 1977 Display technology:  
New price:  $69.95
 69.95
Display size:  n.a.
Size:  9.3" x 7.3" x 2.8"
 235 x 185 x 70 mm3
Printer technology:  Thermal
Weight:  2 pounds 6 ounces
 1068 grams
Serial No:  4129849
Batteries:   Date of manufacture:  wk 03 year 1979
AC-Adapter:  120 V Origin of manufacture:  USA
Precision:  10 Integrated circuits:  TMS1118
Memories:  1    
Program steps:   Courtesy of:  Joerg Woerner

This calculator looks similar to the TI-5040 but misses a display and outputs the results only on a thermal printer. Like the TI-5220 the TI-5015 added the useful GT (grand total) feature to the basic functions.

TI-5015_LBL.jpg (93621 Byte)Dismantling a TI-5015 manufactured in Italy reveals a clean design centered around a TMS1118 Single-Chip Microcontroller based on the famous TMS1000 core.

TI-5015_INT.jpg (288939 Byte)Similiar chips were used in the never released SR-40 (Prototype) and the successful TI-5050M.

Printer paper:

The thermal paper used with this printer (TP-30250 2-1/2" wide and 14 Feet length) was discontinued long time ago. In 2008 Appleton (Appleton, WI) manufactured with the Alpha 800-2.4 paper still a compatible paper.

 

 



Find here an excerpt from the Texas Instruments Incorporated leaflet CL-199J dated 1981:

TI-5015

A printing calculator with independent add register and grand total.

Attractive. Economical. Prints a clear, legible tape. Quickly. Whisper-quiet.
Using standard business machine sequence, this light-weight compact calculator adds, subtracts, multiplies and divides. Handles multiplications and divisions of a constant, automatic percentages and credit balance.
The independent add register allows you o perform multiplication and division without affecting previous add/subtract entries. Non-add key prints reference numbers without affecting calculations. Grand total register automatically accumulates totals from the add register. And, its ribbon-less printer is as reliable as it is quiet, while quality is consistently high.

Texas Instruments, 1981

 

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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

Joerg Woerner, December 5, 2001. No reprints without written permission.