DATAMATH  CALCULATOR  MUSEUM

About the Datamath Calculator Museum

The Mission

The Datamath Calculator Museum helps to preserve the spectacular achievements of Texas Instruments on the electronic calculator history initiated with Jack Kilby’s invention of the integrated circuit (IC) in 1958, the Cal-Tech project in 1965, leading to the “calculator-on-a-chip” in 1971 that made the calculator available to everyone. The Datamath Calculator Museum features every Texas Instruments calculator from the early TI-2500 Datamath introduced in 1972 to the latest TI-Nspire CX graphing calculator, the educational toys started with the Little Professor and the all speech products like ET’s Speak & Spell.

The Albums

The Datamath Calculator Museum is centered on the electronic calculators, educational toys and speech products developed and manufactured by Texas Instruments.

You’ll find in the so-called “Albums” a detailed and pictured specification sheet of every electronic calculator and related product manufactured by Texas Instruments from the earliest beginnings in 1972 till today. To complete the Datamath Calculator Museum, we include information about calculators manufactured by Texas Instruments and sold under different badges and even calculators somehow related to Texas Instruments or influencing their product development.

The Technical Section

In the Technical Section you will find a lot of useful information about the AC-adapters and Battery Packs supplied with TI products. In addition you’ll discover information about the various integrated circuits (IC’s) used in electronic calculators and speech synthesizers. Last but not least do we host repair guides, programming guides, undocumented features of programmable calculators and even X-Ray pictures of some calculators.
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The Historical Section

In the Historical Section you will find the story of the portable electronic calculator starting with the Cal-Yech Project initiated by Texas Instruments in the year 1965 following the path to the Datamath calculator and culminating in the first graphing calculators.

The Download Section

In the Download Section you will find hundreds of product manuals, sales cataloges and sales leaflets. Don’t miss some nice PC-based calculator simulations and the sound samples of the speech products.

The Links

In the Link Section you will find various links to the websites of other calculator collectors focusing on (or at least not ignoring) Texas Instruments products.

The About Section

In this About Section you will find more information about TI’s Educational Technology, other companies featured in the Datamath Calculator Museum and last but not least, some information about myself.

The Updates

In the Update Section all major additions to the Datamath Calculator Museum are reported.

 

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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

© Joerg Woerner, January 13, 2001. No reprints without written permission.