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Texas Instruments TI-30X Plus MultiView™

Date of introduction:  April 2015 Display technology:  LCD dot matrix
New price:   Display size:  4 * 16 characters
 (5 * 19 for menus)
Size:  6.8" x 3.2" x 0.6"
 172 x 83 x 15 mm³
   
Weight:  4.2 ounces, 120 grams Serial No:  
Batteries:  Solar cells + CR2032 Date of manufacture:  mth 02 year 2015
AC-Adapter:   Origin of manufacture:  Philippines (L)
Precision:  13 Integrated circuits:  
Memories:  8    
Program steps:   Courtesy of:  Joerg Woerner

Texas Instruments announced in May 2010 with the TI-30XS MultiView the successor of its long lasting TI-30X IIS introduced already in 1999 and slightly redesigned in 2004. In February 2008 followed with the TI-34 MultiView and TI-Collège Plus the successors of the TI-34 II resp. TI-Collège. The TI-30X Pro MultiView followed in 2010 and for Back-To-School 2015 Texas Instruments introduced in Germany, Austria and Switzerland this TI-30X Plus MultiView.

 

Instead of the in 1999 novel 2-line display the TI-30X Plus MultiView features a dot matrix display with 31 * 96 addressable pixels allowing the calculator to display equations as they would be printed in a text book. 

In addition to this so called "MathPrint" mode the calculator sports a TI-30X IIS compatible "Classic" mode.

 

Comparing the original TI-30X Pro MultiView and this TI-30X Plus MultiView reveals a minor difference - the latter doesn't support some features:

Numeric derivative
Numeric integral
Numeric equation solver
Polynomial solver

The reasons for this down-grading are pretty obvious - two States in Germany (Bavaria and Baden Wurttemberg) don't allow these features in their High Schools anymore.  

Dismantling this TI-30X Plus MultiView manufactured in February 2015 reveals a pretty common construction with two printed circuit boards (PCB's). The main PCB hides the single-chip calculating circuit under a small protection blob of black epoxy and drives the graphing display with a heat sealed fine-pitch connector. The keyboard makes use of a much simpler second PCB and a heat sealed connector, too. The prominent SR-21 SR-34 designation on the main PCB proves that this calculator was manufactured by Kinpo Electronics, Inc., a famous company located in Taiwan and doing calculator production for well established companies like Texas Instruments, Hewlett Packard, Casio, Canon and Citizen.

Please notice that the calculator was manufactured in the Philippines instead of China.

 

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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

© Joerg Woerner, May 10, 2015. No reprints without written permission.