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Texas Instruments TI-1001 (First Design)

Date of introduction:  1981 Display technology:  LCD
New price:  $10 (October 1981) Display size:  8
Size:  4.6" x 2.6" x 0.35"
 116 x 66 x 9 mm3
   
Weight:  1.9 ounces, 54 grams Serial No:  
Batteries:  2*LR43  Date of manufacture:  wk 05 year 1981
AC-Adapter:   Origin of manufacture:  USA (ATA)
Precision:  8 Integrated circuits:  TP0311
Memories:  1    
Program steps:   Courtesy of:  Joerg Woerner
    Download manual:   (US: 1.8 MByte)

The TI-1001 is another design of the original TI-1030 calculator. You should compare it with the TI-1031, the ET calculator and the TI-1750-III, too.

The TI-1001 was used as the base calculator for the TI-1850 Visor Kit and the TI-1880 Checkwriter.

This calculator was produced both in Italy and US. Within one year of its introduction the keyboard design was slightly changed, don't miss the second generation of the TI-1001 manufactured in the US and the TI-1001 made in Italy.



Find here an excerpt from the Texas Instruments Incorporated leaflet CL-199J dated 1981:

TI-1001

Economical, pocket-portable, six function calculator.

Almost everyone in the family can use it - around the house, in class, at the office - even outdoors. Sleekly styled, lightweight, thin as a pencil. Fits easily into a pocket, purse or brief case to go where you go. 
Get fast, accurate answers to addition, subtraction, multiplication and division problems. Even square roots. A percent key automatically calculates percentages. Automatic constant feature eliminates the need to reenter a number in repetitive calculations. 
TIís APD* automatic power down feature helps prevent accidental battery drain by turning off the calculator after approximately four minutes of non-use. 

* Registered Trademark of Texas Instruments Incorporated

© Texas Instruments, 1981

The TI-1001 is featured in the Texas Instruments Incorporated leaflet CL-199M dated 1983.

 

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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

© Joerg Woerner, March 7, 2013. No reprints without written permission.