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CASIO fx-300ES

Date of introduction:  2006 Display technology:  LCD dot matrix
New price:   Display size:  3 * 15 characters
Size:  6.3" x 3.1" x 0.45"
 160 x 78 x 12 mm3
   
Weight:  3.5 ounces, 98 grams Serial No:  
Batteries:  Solar cells + LR44 Date of manufacture:  mth 04 year 2007
AC-Adapter:   Origin of manufacture:  China
Precision:  15 Integrated circuits:  
Memories:  7    
Program steps:   Courtesy of:  Joerg Woerner

Casio introduced with the fx-115ES already in 2005 an advanced scientific calculator with a 2-line Natural Textbook Display showing formulas and results exactly as they appear in the textbook. Texas Instruments followed mid-2007 with the TI-30XS MultiView and Sharp joined the group with its EL-W531 series introduced late-2007.

In June 2008 we know eight Casio calculators sporting the Natural Textbook Display:

Type Power Supply Functions Commments
fx-83ES, fx-83ES, fx-350ES AAA battery 249  
fx-85ES, fx-30ES Solar + LR44 249  
fx-570ES AAA battery 403 40 constants, 20 conversions,
complex numbers, N-base numbers
fx-115ES, fx-991ES Solar + LR44 403 40 constants, 20 conversions,
complex numbers, N-base numbers

In addition to this so called "Math Format" mode the calculator sports a traditional "Linear Format" mode.

Dismantling the Casio fx-300ES reveals a pretty common construction with a single printed circuit board (PCB). The PCB hides the single-chip calculating circuit under a small protection blob of black epoxy and drives the graphing display with a heat sealed fine-pitch connector. The prominent SR380 designation on the main PCB proves that this calculator was manufacturered by Kinpo Electronics, Inc., a famous company located in Taiwan and doing calculator production for well established companies like Texas Instruments, Hewlett Packard, Casio, Canon and Citizen. 

Please compare the Casio fx-300ES with its competitors Sharp EL-W535 and Texas Instruments TI-30XS MultiView.

 

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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

Joerg Woerner, June 8, 2008. No reprints without written permission.