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Texas Instruments Language Teacher

Date of introduction:  1980 Display technology:  Fluorescent
New price:   Display size:  10 alphanumeric
Size:  8.0" x 3.4" x 1.25" 
 202 x 87 x 32 mm3
   
Weight:  8.1 ounces, 230 grams Serial No:  0001490
Batteries:  4*AA cells Date of manufacture:  wk 47 year 1980
AC-Adapter:  AC9199 Origin of manufacture:  USA (ATA)
Precision:   Integrated circuits:  TMC0275(?), TMC0280 + Module: TMC0350 
Memories:      
Program steps:   Courtesy of:  Joerg Woerner

Shortly after the invention of the synthesizer technology to reproduce human speech with tuned voices stored in ROMs (Read Only Memories - Integrated Circuits), Texas Instruments introduced in August 1979 the Language Translator. This product was later renamed to Language Tutor and the selling price was reduced by 40 percent. Within a few months this Language Teacher was introduced, obviously was the loudspeaker removed and the interface reduced to a keyboard and display.



Dismantling this Language Tutor manufactured in November 1980 by Texas instruments in its Abilene, TX facility reveals printed circuit board (PCB) identical to the Language Tutor with some components, e.g. the loudspeaker and its electronics not populated.

The design is centered around a TMC0280 Voice Synthesis Processors (VSP) - also known as TMS5110 - and a TMS0275 (not confirmed) single-chip microcontroller. We assume that the microcontroller is a member of the TMS1270 family, optimized for vacuum fluorescent displays (VFD).



An easy accessible "Language Module" contains the software to translate from e.g. English, French and Spanish to German. Other modules to translate to English, French or Spanish were available. These Language Modules contain only one TMC0350 Read Only Memories (ROMs) - also known as Voice Synthesis Memories TMS6100 - with 128 kBits compared to the "Solid State Speech™ Module" with four ROMs, each.

Language

Speech Module

Speech ROMs

German


 

 



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If you have additions to the above article please email: joerg@datamath.org.

© Joerg Woerner, December 5, 2001. No reprints without written permission.